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are the big challenges year, what are the things different now? from a technology perspective, this is pretty easy. i can tell you that if we were to do this today, you would say, i cannot believe you were using lte phones and 4g, as i am using 6g. joining us is a director for cisco systems business solution group, which is a global strategy and consulting arm. prior to that, he was president and ceo of government's strategy is of a leading market research firm from 2001 to 2003 heading the industry advisory council, a founding member of a council, and he spent 28 years in the federal government, including being the first cio at the department of commerce, and he is also a winner. doug bourgeois is the chief for vmware. prior to that, he was the director of national business center at interior, where he provided business management services government wide like the ones we talked about he had several roles at fedex. he has also hosted the vmware's i.t. challenge. it airs in the washington, d.c., market. mark forman is the first official c.i.o., president and co-founder of government transacti
. this committee could give us a sense of direction. you have to commit yourself to high-risk technology. you reduce the time it takes to go to mars. you do it. we can develop technologies along those lines. it will take the committee's decision to give nascent those kinds of instructions to move it forward. there are ways to reach out for some of the other things we are doing. since i left congress i've been involved with the ffrdc. they recommend that at least some of the nasa centers near to that kind of model. you can have both a government funding stream going into the operation as well as outside money coming in to do other things. that allows you to have some other streams of money that is not depend on the appropriations process. seems to me this committee could come up was someone along those lines. that allows you to look forward as well as find the resources necessary. that is what i'm trying to suggest. think that is possible. i've worked with these companies looking to do exciting things. they would love to have nasa as a partner. you have to find out a way to find the ways for n
for the suggestion. we have about 25 minutes left. we'll come back and talk with jason pontin of the "mit technology review." the subject is about solving big problems in america. we'll take your calls in a moment. [video clip] >> the british admirals and generals were reporting to the crown that the colonists were sending ships everywhere to try to get ammunition and muskets and cannons. this was after the british had sent more troops to boston after the boston tea party and it's clear the colonists were pulling together the ammunition and cannons. the king basically prohibited british ships from taking ammunition and everything to the colonies unless it was officially sanctioned. they were very alert to this. as soon as the collins found out about the order in new hampshire and rhode island, they took the ammunition so everybody knew it was coming in the winter of 77 for-1775 -- in the winter of 1774-1775. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we are focusing on the "mit technology review." we are talking about big problems in the world. we will get to this coverage in just a second. this is ja
that companies that try to be innovative are not innovative. well, our technology leaders, the people who really inspired me, they were inspired by these wonderful things happening. i'm going to focus on a little period of time. as short as four years, maybe six or seven. it is that time that orville wright and his brother took off. the world realized -- they did not do that with photoshop. since that first flight, the people who had taken a flight could sit in that first wrote and only three of you would have taken a turn. we did not even have the internet. can you imagine? going from that -- they were building 500 airplanes a year in france by then. in four years. and of course, the airplane was invented by natural selection. we did not help -- we did not know how to do with. the ones that did not tell the pilot, they are today's airplane. [laughter] i believe that kids were inspired by this wonderful short period of time. on the 100th anniversary of the wright brothers applied, at aviation week asked me and others to say what i thought about the first 100 years of aerospace. who were the move
do you think are some of the most effective mechanisms? >> technologically, for -- well, the biggest -- the quickest thing -- our energy efficiency in the u.s. isn't -- is not very good. and we've run economic models which suggest that if we put a $10 a ton tax on carbon, increasing $10 a ton per year, so that after 10 years, it's equivalent to a dollar a gallon on gasoline. that that would reduce carbon emissions in the us by 30%. which is about 11 times -- that 30% reduction is 11 times greater than the amount of carbon carried by this keystone xl pipeline. so it just shows how foolish that pipeline is, compared to the kind of steps that we should really be taking to ensure our energy independence. but the -- there are multiple ways that price would affect -- would reduce emissions. but, yeah, i -- and i don't really know that i should or could actually specify what -- which technology is gonna do. as i say, the marketplace is going to make those decisions. but there's a lot of potential already, well california is twice as efficient as the rest of the nation. it's about equivalent
all aspects of technology that will have tremendous impact. even though they examples you mention are compelling, there are many aspects that come from a human side of nasa as well. i would not subscribe to that kind of recommendation. >> lower the emphasis a bit. >> making a distinction between science and exploration, nasa is more than just a science agency, it is an exploration agency, a tool of u.s. farm policy. just looking at sites as defined in the service, it is realistic for. the reason why you do human in part is for exploring the unknown, but putting people in an unusual or alien situation. you learn things you would not learn if he stayed at home. there is a wonderful example looking at someone -- and viruses and how they become changed in space. this means there is a gene sequencing issue. if we can figure out how to control but, we could have a potential vaccine for salmonella. that is not the thing that would emerge into a ground based laboratory. it emerges might put people in a very different environment to go into the unknown. human space flight is probably the m
in motion control technology, with a thriving defense unit, a $2.5 billion company that employs 8,400 people, takes a major hit. that's >> i encourage my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to spend last time and instead pass a -- family, seniors, and small business owners. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired, for what purpose does the gentlewoman from florida rise? without objection. ms. wilson: today is new year's eve. while we debate going over the fiscal cliff, there are some people in america planning to shoot their guns in celebration at midnight. put down those guns. millions of people have died or been injured due to this custom. put down those guns. if i were in my district of miami today, i would be participating in a press conference that we started 10 years ago calling an end to this deadly custom. as a result, celebratory gunfire has largely disappeared from our county. it is a result of repeated demands and media events over and over again. now people get it. remember, what goes up must come down. bullets are no excep
effective mechanisms? >> technologically, for -- well, the biggest -- the quickest thing -- our energy efficiency in the u.s. isn't -- is not very good. and we've run economic models which suggest that if we put a $10 a ton tax on carbon, increasing $10 a ton per year, so that after 10 years, it's equivalent to a dollar a gallon on gasoline. that that would reduce carbon emissions in the us by 30%. which is about 11 times -- that 30% reduction is 11 times greater than the amount of carbon carried by this keystone xl pipeline. so it just shows how foolish that pipeline is, compared to the kind of steps that we should really be taking to ensure our energy independence. but the -- there are multiple ways that price would affect -- would reduce emissions. but, yeah, i -- and i don't really know that i should or could actually specify what -- which technology is gonna do. as i say, the marketplace is going to make those decisions. but there's a lot of potential already, well california is twice as efficient as the rest of the nation. it's about equivalent to europe, which is also twice as e
her child will have the opportunity to go tco college. this reminds me of the yankee's technology questions. -- y2k technology question. we can only hope that a settlement happens here over the course of the next few days. if that does not happen, let's hope you're able to get it turned around early next year. >> are you preparing for possibly being someone who helps "solve the problem"? do you think the 130th congress might be voting on something bigger -- 113th congress might be voting on something bigger? >> i am not sure if a short-term deal will happen. most of those kinds of meetings tend to be theatrics unless there is a deal done. we're looking very much like this is going to be open and live in the first part of next year. -- and alive in the first part of next year. for those of us who are rookies, we will have no choice but to jump into the fray. the debt ceiling is looming. it was announced in the in the last couple of days. there is no question that we're going to have to have something done early next year. because more than a third of this body has been here for les
with the great improvements in technology that unleashed the powers of capitalism, and capitalism manage to produce immense wealth. something unpleasant but -- and at the same time produce poverty that had never been known before. the debt is to capitalism what hell is to christianity. unpleasant, but absolutely necessary. in a sense, capitalism is about ecological economics, even though capitalists don't want to hear this. it is about recycling. we had heard of the term by the 1970's, especially about the green movement in europe. capitalism has always been recycling. the process of described is a process whereby the entrepreneur is now forced to be an entrepreneur. the ex-peasants, they did not choose to be entrepreneurs. they had to be. they used debt. bringing it to the present, energizing the production process, producing the wealth from which he hopes that he will be able to repay the debt. the moneylenders, later the bankers. cover for the fact that he had paid wages for capital goods. hoping there is something left for him, for profit. debt is all about intertemporal recycling. b
voters online this campaign than we registered altogether in the last campaign. so the technology has made it easier to organize. in a weird way, the technology has made it easier to individualize hour appeal to voters and the dialogue with voters. i think what was done with this campaign was light years ahead of what we did in the last campaign. whoever is in 2016 will have to reinvent it again because the technology changes so rapidly. twitter was nothing four years ago, and look how important it was in this campaign. one other surprise -- i was surprised at how little the republicans invested in the field in their primary campaign. one thing that really benefited us in 2008 was we had a 50- state primary campaign. from the beginning, we were determined to run a very aggressive and field campaign. we set up operations and all the states -- in all the states. in the battleground states, those organizations sustain themselves. in iowa, that was very important. so i would not, given the nature of the process, at least in those early states, if i were running in 2016 i would not do what
, they are rooted in scientific discovery and technological innovation. there has to be a greater appreciation for the role of science and technology in society. we have to get young women engaged early. we found that if young women are engaged in experiments to work, if they are part of the team, it makes a big difference. we try to create an intergene rational mentoring system. when young women come through the ranks through the promotion and tenure process, we have to ensure fairness of the system. it is a complex problem. that is why it is hard for people to talk about it. >> why is it important that there are more women? >> it is important that there be more science. we are about to face what i call the quiet crisis. you have a number of scientists in this country who came of age when i did. they are beginning to retire. those retirements are going to accelerate over the next few years. the second hidden variable is that we depend strongly on immigrants. we have always been a nation of immigrants. i do not think people appreciate how much of our science and engineering work force is made
, then distribution, then production. in conjunction with the great improvements in technology that unleashed the powers of capitalism, and capitalism manage to produce immense wealth, and at the same time produce poverty that had never been known before. the debt is to capitalism what hell is to christianity. unpleasant, but absolutely necessary for it to work. in a sense, capitalism is about ecological economics, even though capitalists don't want to hear this. it is about recycling. we had heard of the term by the 1970's, especially about the green movement in europe. capitalism has always been recycling. the process of described is a process whereby the entrepreneur is now forced to be an entrepreneur. the ex-peasants, they did not choose to be entrepreneurs. they had to be. they used debt. bringing it to the present, energizing the production process, producing the wealth from which he hopes that he will be able to repay the debt. the moneylenders, later the bankers. cover for the fact that he had paid wages for capital goods. hoping there is something left for him, for profit. debt is a
we steady besides voting and what voters decided. we study technology and how it is changing the way people engaged with campaigns. we study a lot about survey research as a practice going on. i am open to talking about those as well. >> thank you. [applause] >> let me start with a question, michael. you mentioned earlier about the composition of the electorate and what that meant. you made the comment about a new way of thinking. people are now talking about the dwindling white portion of the electorate. i am wondering for what that means in shifts in public opinion on various matters. the fact that we actually have a shrinking white electorate so that minority groups, latinos, and african-americans are playing a larger proportion of the electorate. what does that mean and thinking about public opinion? >> i think it is critical. clearly one of the biggest changes in the overlap of the generational changes. 18-29-year old voters, 42 percent for nine why -- for non- white. this is a generational wave coming in. the way behind it, the folks 0- 18 right now are even more in that direct
been built in, rather than using some other technology that is newer, available -- it might be scary if your the person whose job is going to be lost when the data center goes down. >> at the heart of every internet enterprise our data centers, which are becoming more sprawling and ubiquitous as the amount of stored information explodes, starting in community after community. but the microsoft experience in quincy, washington shows that when these internet factories come to town, they can feel a bit more like old-time manufacturing than modern magic. what is the quincy, washington story? >> the story we set out to tell there was just sort of microsoft comes to town. it is a small town, around 7000 people. it has one quality that sets it apart from a lot of other small towns. it sits near the columbia river and a couple of hydroelectric dams that produce very cheap and continuous power. microsoft came to town in 2005 or so, 2006. what the story shows is that while you have this up-to-the- minute corporate image of what a digital company like microsoft is, it is a lot more like a tradi
of years as opposed to decades or centuries, because that's what the capitalists and did through technology and innovation, the moment you start doing that, like having a machine that prints money, so you want to use more faster and more intensely, producing more money. if you overreach and take too much value from the future to bring it into the present, you too. the sectors in which this dynamic annapolis process is manchin to push the boundaries of technology and create wealth -- in amsterdam and holland the with-it is always local lines. there will always be surplus riches. regis and surplus regions. southern england was in debt. now is the obvious. similarly, you have new york state in surplus, washington state inertification plus. it started in manchester, in amsterdam. it is always localized. there will always be defecit regions and surplus regions. so, manchester northern england was in surplus back then. southern england was in debt. now it is the opposite. similarly, you have new york state in surplus, washington state in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your eq
. [applause] how would i advise a president who is not interested in nasa doing better technologies and doing exploration like it did in the 1960's? is that a better question? i was telling him that the public's has an expectation for this $18 billion, that you spend a large percentage of it, maybe even a large majority of it, on pure research. in other words, i want you to take my tax payer money and go out and try to do something that you may not be able to do. in fact, i call it research only if half the people think is impossible. if most of the people think it is possible, then you are doing development. you are not a research organization. if you took anybody out of nasa, out of engineering, i don't care if they were head of nasa or a secretary or a shop guy, when jfk got up and said 21 days after alan shepard made this little flight, that we are going to go to the moon before 1970, everybody jumped up and down. you know why? multi-year funding. wow, we are going to have jobs for nine years. yes, we can do it. this is cool. we will beat the russians. everybody was real excited. grab any
to support a growing population. we have not develop the technologies to solve those problems. here at home we have a very high unemployment rate. and of course, we have a generation of aging baby boomers, like myself, who are wondering how we are going to support ourselves and our retirement. these are all big problems. my thesis is that we will get much further toward solving them if we can engage the power of the private sector to contribute to peace and prosperity. i tell people, i love corporations. i study them the way jane goodall studies chimpanzees. and i appreciate their potential to help solve their as problems -- to help solve those problems, to provide jobs to people who need to make a living, and provide decent investment returns. to come up with the technologies that can help us have a more sustainable future where we are in harmony with the environment and the planet. a lot of corporations are doing those things, but not as well as corporations could. corporations could contribute still more toward human welfare and avoid doing damage in some areas where they do, if only we
education and research and development, investing in clean energy and technology, investing in infrastructure and dealing with the deficits were more -- in a more balanced way. it was about what our obligations are to each other. it was about big things. those are very, very big things. i will say that, for all of the critique about whether our campaign was about big things or not, the preoccupations of people who write about that -- and i used to do that for a living -- i don't try to separate myself -- many of them are my best friends -- there is an awful lot of horse race coverage of this presidential race. there is such a preoccupation with who will win and who will lose and so little real interest in what the implications are. >> we were talking about pulling. >> public polling is so voluminous now. any to kids with an abacus can do a poll of the corner grocery store and some national news are in position will cover it as if it is news. and maybe the billion tommy pulled him out today. -- the billy and tommy poll came out today. it can be done sound yet they produce res
across the united states. including manufacturers, universities, technology, pharmaceutical and biotech companies and innovators. as the provisions of the leahy 46 smith a.i.a. continue to take effect, the nation's infrastructure becomes much stronger, unleashing the full potential of american innovators and job creators. i ask unanimous consent to place the balance of my remarks in the record and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. scott: i rise -- i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. smith: i rise -- mr. scott: i rise in support of h.r. 662, because it improves the america invents act. earlier this year, the house passed h.r. 6621 in a vote of 3088-89. the senate passed the legislation with an amendment by unanimous concept. now that the america invents act is law, our focus should be on how it can be improoveed. this is why i support h.r. 6621 because it accomplishes that very goal in s
technology. they find a myriad of ways to apply it. when they began to apply it, they have to collaborate. at that point it will start to organize itself in ways we cannot imagine. do ise're trying to engineer the world -- a world movement. >> if i can ask you to keep it brief so we can maybe take another one. >> you mentioned that some of these movements have fizzled out. the biggest crisis is climate change. what do you think social movements can do to turn this around and make corporations and governments take action? >> i have been working with 350.org and [inaudible] if youy have -- if you have not checked it out, 350.or. -- org. as we have seen with the last election, the discussion was not about the numbers, it was about the emotional logic. hob it cannot argue with the storm. it will comments masher house. even if you are ann coulter, it will smash your house. this is about internalizing science and making the science become part of the cultural vocabulary. the problem with the right-wing agenda with this huge cloud of disinformation is people are very naive and the arts can help
parts of his said administration as a technology bubble that falls apart, he gets rid of the glass-steagall prohibition on the amalgamation of all the financial sector. i cannot see what his legacy was aside from the fact he was a very capable operator. craig huey britain a lot about george h. w. bush and george. w. george you did not care for them? >> i did not. george h. w. bush was a nice guy. he was always sending people thank you notes. he was a nice man. he was a thank you note president. he was not a particularly dynamic leader of any sort. then you get to george w. bush. i cannot imagine it how he could have ever gotten there. you could say that about six or so american presidents. by the time you got to see him in action you wanted to say, george h. w. bush, please come back. the mere fact that jeb bush is making noises in the woodwork is enough. >> barack obama? >> i voted for him in the first race. i did not the second time around. i did not vote for romney either. i don't think he's a leader. i don't think he is a very effective executive. i think he is somebody who is
of technological innovation. usd not want to see a lose that again. -- i do not want to see us lose that again. host: 1 more tweet, once capital gains are taxed at the same rate as income, investors will still invest -- will not change a thing. guest: that depends what the rates are. history shows that to be true time and time again. whether the democrats institute the cuts, or whether the republicans do it, you can see the results. some countries around the world that have left of center governments have massively simplify their tax code, put in flat tax rates. revenues have mushroomed. host: the next call comes from santa elena, texas. caller: can somehow every state verify the people from health care, medicare, medicaid to be sure the people qualify? i did not know if i am right or wrong -- if we give medicare and medicaid to people who just come from other nations, no matter where, and they qualify -- we have a problem with medicaid and medicare. can we do some the about it? -- something about it? we have a lot of intelligent people. with everybody working together, we can do something. ho
the technologies to solve those problems. here at home we have a very high unemployment rate. and of course, we have a generation of aging baby boomers, like myself, who are wondering how we are going to support ourselves and our retirement. these are all big problems. my thesis is that we will get much further toward solving them if we can engage the power of the private sector to contribute to peace and prosperity. i tell people, i love corporations. i study them the way jane goodall studies chimpanzees. and i appreciate their potential to help solve those problems, to provide jobs to people who need to make a living, and provide decent investment returns. to come up with the technologies that can help us have a more sustainable future where we are in harmony with the environment and the planet. a lot of corporations are doing those things, but not as well as corporations could. corporations could contribute still more toward human welfare and avoid doing damage in some areas where they do, if only we can correct what i have come to view as a very mistaken and ultimately counterproductive ide
is the technology and the other is the demand and fundraising. they spend so much time raising money and the do not have time to spend together. everything is different. nothing about the senate is better other than the influx of women. the fact that we have 20 now, which is a record, that makes a big difference. on the other hand, the hyper partisan senate is interesting. a number of people have said over time, boy, the senators must not like your book. they're fine with the book. they do not think much of the senate. [laughter] the frustration is the same as the public's. my sympathy extends to a certain point. have the power to change it. it does not have to be the way that it is. >> i want to go back to a point that he made. what they leave out, it was a tough race. they gave the vote count and everything else. kennedy started working for five years to make sure byrd never becomes majority leader. he interviews a number of people. he does not want to take byrd onto himself. he is looking for a person to take on. a lot of people are predicting humphrey's victory. he had tremendous support. i
carried out a missile launch using ballistic missile technology in correct defiance of the international community this important resolution condemns their launch, calls on the north korea to live up to its commitments, admere to its international obligations and deal piecefully with its neighbors. this is a blatant violation of the u.n. security council resolutions. 1718 and 1874. we urge the security council to take strong and concerted action to demonstrate that pyongyang's actions are completely unacceptable. in familiar -- in particular we call on china and russia to work construct ily with other members of the council to show that the international community is united in condemning north korea's provocative behavior. north korea is only further isolating itself with its irresponsible action and the development of ballistic missiles and nuclear weapons will never bring the real security and acceptance by the international community that the regime so desperately wants. instead of pouring hundreds of millions of dollars into its so-called space program, nuclear programs, and massive
of changing -- changing technology. but let me make two more points about young people. let me tell you two stories about poland. we were in poland i think eight years ago in september i was going to visit the supreme courts in poland. and when you go to european countries you have to go to three supreme courts often, the constitution court, the administrative court, and a court of general jurisdiction. you go to three dinners and bring three gifts. [laughter] >> but there are fine judges and fine courts. at first i was teaching in krakow for a few days and then went to warsaw and i ranged to meet with the faculty at the university of warsaw and they explained the students wouldn't be there. it's the third week in september. i don't think they were coming until the first week in october. but the fact we were going to be there, arranged for me to meet with the faculty, and we did. midway through the meeting, though, there are some notes being passed and they said oh, justice kennedy, we didn't realize our answering law students are here for an orientation day and would like you to talk with
in technology and education and really making sure we don't cut the necessary programs that can help us do that growth and so we have to make them a priority and perhaps deprioritize other spending areas we will be able to grow with the global economy . manufacturing has already come back to some degree i know that apple computers are actually moving a couple production facilities back to the united states from china. there's a real key is to make sure that we're continuing to invest in those types of investments and help us compete on a global scale. but we should also realize that it helps us when apple can produce their goods in china in a more cheap efficient manner than we could here because american consumers can get i pods and i phones on a much discounted basis from what it would be if we tried to do it all here. and so if we don't spend all that money on those i phones here that opens up a whole new industry of productivity. for instance, productivities is something people made a lot more off of in the united states than they would have if we manufactured the devices here so this
and initiatives that help shape education technology over the past generation. senator rockefeller, who was privileged to work with on so many issues, with doggedly determined to enact this benchmark initiative. in typical fashion, he was not going to take no for an answer which made us it perfect coauthors as i was equally determined. by working with members of both parties were willing to judge on the merits, we overcame the hurdles and the program was born. during the 2001 tax debate, senator blanche lincoln and i, as members of the finance committee, joined together to increase the amount of the child tax credit and make it refundable so that they could still benefit from the credit. ultimately, the measure was enacted becoming the second refundable tax credit ever and in ensuring the child tax credit would exist with an additional 13 million more children and with 500,000 of them out of poverty. madam president, i also think about my friend, senator landrieu, sitting in the chamber roswell and how we formed the senate common ground coalition again to rekindle cross-party relations.
been founded in cambridge it would be different because the technology founded where it happened. british is a u.s. business. the activity that happens in the u.k. even if you have to describe it as sales activity which is not exactly what the people do, we can still go and get that activity from the open market at the kind of cost that we're paying the u.k. >> fallout from all of that led to starbucks saying it would pay $20 million pounds. it aradio tributed to margaret hodges given the parliamentarian of the year award. now off to the house of lords where the government suffered a series of defeats in secret court hearings in civil cases. the government wanted the government to hear the evidence in what are closed closed material proceed rgs. which include the public, the media and even the american who brought the case. the intelligent services could be compromised. at the moment the government finds itself unable to defend some compensation claims for fear of blowing the government of secret agents or government sources. >> we are up next since the ter techniques and people.
the right investments in technology and education, making sure we do not cut the necessary programs to do the growth, you have to make that a priority. we will be able to grow with the global economy. manufacturing has already come back to some degree. i know that apple is moving a couple of production facilities back to the united states from china. the real key is making sure that we are continuing to invest in those kinds of investments. we should also realize that apple can produce the goods in china in a more cheap and efficient manner than here. because american consumers can get an ipod or and i from on a much discounted basis from what it would be if we tried to do it all here and if we do not spend money on the iphone sphere, that is a new industry of productivity. something that people have made much more of love in the united states than they would have if they simply manufactured those devices. it is just a question of keeping our workers educated and making sure we have advancements for the future. host: more on the continuing series, this is from "the new york times." host:
. resources matter. whether its personnel or, in the case of some of the work i did, information technology, hardware, whatever it takes we got to dedicate the resources. we cannot get the results you want just by yelling and screaming. you've got to have investment and resources. third point i would make is that your credibility at the department will be greatly enhanced by the pace of implementation, by the demonstrable success you have. in other words, that taxpayers can see that you have made those changes, and by the steps you are taking now in the next couple of days and weeks. that's mostly important for the broader concerns that we have, but it's especially important when you come back here and ask for dollars. i will stand with anyone to say that resources matter. i know that from personal experience, but your credibility would be enhanced when you ask for those resources, when you can specifically focus on what those resources will go for, and how you're going to be able to change the dynamics. so let me, i know i don't have much time, but with a predicate company asked a question
anybody ever heard of -- stems? raise your hand. stands for science, technology, engineering and math, and the are the jobs which are going to be around in the future. actual he the key jobs of the new jersey economy and we should allo to our local councils, our partner organizations, and we're trying to incorporate the significance of stem within schools and colleges around the city, and i challenge every single youth parliament member here today to go away t your cities and councils and partner organizations and try to encourage them to incorporate the significance of stem program within your schools and colleges an come back next year and share with us what you found. thse are the jobs of the knowledge economy. >> now, i'm looking for a london woman. a london woman who has not spoken before. have you spoken before? you did. i think it wouldn't be fair to others. i thought you had spoken earlier. this woman is going to fall off her seat and i want to see that. that would be a sadness. >> i'm -- thank you, mr. speaker. thank you. [applause] >> anybody here who knows today that i was
, they have this biometric technology, where they think print individuals -- fingerprint individuals to make sure they're not committing fraud. that is been controversial. host: alisha coleman-jensen -- food insecurity by poverty status, 2011 figures. guest: food insecurity and is often related to a lack of economic resources, and we find the prevalence is quite high with household incomes before the below the federal poverty level -- below the federal poverty level. host: another tweet -- , corn is wasted on making fuel while people are going hungry. is that part of the problem? guest: i think it is more of an economic issue than a supply issue. we're looking at low income families and resources to purchase the food. host: spat and island, extension -- step and island, new york. caller: i want to not focus on the specifics. i would label many dinos and r hinos as cinos, holding to their corporate funders more than people in the state. guest: i am one point to make their. the food stamp program was in the news during the presidential campaign. there was a lot talk about caseloads going up, i
this biometric technology, where they think print individuals -- fingerprint individuals to make sure they're not committing fraud. that is been controversial. host: alisha coleman-jensen -- food insecurity by poverty status, 2011 figures. guest: food insecurity is often related to a lack of economic resources, and we find the prevalence is quite high with household incomes below the federal poverty level. host: another tweet -- corn is wasted on making fuel while people are going hungry. is that part of the problem? guest: i think it is more of an economic issue than a supply issue. we're looking at low income families and resources to purchase the food. host: staten island, new york. caller: i want to not focus on the specifics. i would label many dinos and rinos as cinos, holding to their corporate funders more than people in the state. guest: i have one point to make there. the food stamp program was in the news during the presidential campaign. there was a lot talk about caseloads going up, and the implication was that these caseloads should be cut and that is a bad thing. what we lea
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